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Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

The pelvic floor is a set of musculature that originate from the pubic bone and extend through the bottom of the pelvis to the coccyx (tailbone). Their function is to support the pelvic organs (bowel, bladder and sexual organs), assist in urinary and fecal continence, aid in sexual satisfaction, stabilize connecting muscles and joints, and act as a lymphatic pump for the lower extremities. The pelvic floor has a trampoline-like function to aide in shock absorption during functional activities and work in partnership with the abdominal muscles to control internal pressure. But, this area, just like any other group of muscles, can sustain injury or pain for many reasons. Some of those causes could be child birth, trauma, surgery, history of chronic low back pain being a high impact athlete like a gymnast or weightlifter.

What are the symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction?

  • Urinary incontinence
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • Painful intercourse
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Constipation
  • Fecal incontinence
  • Low back or hip pain

How can physical therapy help?

Physical therapists are the musculoskeletal and movement specialists. The pelvic floor is a group of muscles, that when dysfunctional, can benefit from therapeutic interventions necessary to return the individual to their prior level of function. Assessments and treatments are performed by specially trained physical therapists at CPT. Typically, programs consist of extensive history and discussion of limitations that affect each patient's life. All assessments and interventions are performed respecting the patient's emotions and techniques can be altered to specifically fit individual comfort levels.

Treatment may consist of pelvic floor retraining, biofeedback with/without sEMG, pain management, trunk and hip mobility, manual therapy interventions, core stabilization and strengthening, functional activities mimicking daily activities like lifting, household chores, and recreational activities like running , and posture and gait re-education activities. A home program will be established and is an important part of the therapy process, as the patient and PT work together during one-on-one sessions.

  • Urinary incontinence
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • Painful intercourse
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Constipation
  • Fecal incontinence
  • Low back or hip pain